Banza Sanitation

Promoting health and human dignity through improved sanitation


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BANZA ATTENDS THE ICC

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Call it an oasis in the middle of a desert. The Sarova Shaba Lodge located in Isiolo was the perfect setting for the Inter-agency Coordinating Committee meeting held from the 26th to the 27th of September 2013.

Call it an oasis in the middle of a desert. The Sarova Shaba Lodge located in Isiolo was the perfect setting for the Inter-agency Coordinating Committee meeting held from the 26th to the 27th of September 2013.

The meeting organised by the Ministry of Health brought together various stakeholders in the water, sanitation and hygiene sectors to look at ways of how an additional 20million people in Kenya can have access to basic sanitation by the year 2015.

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Dr. Kepha Ombacho, the Chief Public Health Officer and the guest of honour

Dr. Kepha Ombacho, the Chief Public Health Officer and the guest of honour emphasised on the need to avoid duplication of services as there were many opportunities in the devolved system. He encouraged members to maximise on partnerships and in developing new technologies.

Banza Sanitation was among the few technologies that got an invitation and made its debut in the meeting to showcase how the Banza Toilet would help solve the issue of open defecation and promote ODF zones.

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The response was overwhelming, especially when Patrick sat on the Banza toilet.

And the response was overwhelming, especially when Patrick sat on the Banza toilet. The sleepy audience all over sudden came alive and cameras clicked away.  It was amazing just seeing the reaction on the participants faces, with many of them shooting questions all at once. It had to take the coordinator of the meeting to hush the excited audience and call for order.

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Joseph making a presentation to a packed house of stake holders

Institutions like the Kenya Redcross, World Vision, Path, Amref, among others, took a keen interest in trying to connect how the Banza Toilet would help in addressing their challenges.

The Sarova Hotel Management were also very curious about the Banza Toilet, promising to pursue the partnership further. For them the Banza Toilet would be ideal in outdoor settings especially because the unit is convenient, not bulky, and is comfortable to use.

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We were also able to come across these officers decked with guns. They just loved the feel and look of the toilet wondering how they could get one.

We were also able to come across these officers decked with guns. They just loved the feel and look of the toilet wondering how they could get one.

As the country progresses with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) in rural Kenya, we believe the Banza Toilet will go a long way, once scaled-up, in promoting the attainment of Open defecation Free zones especially in low cost settlements.

Banza Sanitationis honoured to have been recognised by the government as having innovated a viable solution to a persistent problem.

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Over 100 participants at the ICC


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THE REALITY OF SANITATION

EVER FELT SO THIRSTY BUT THERE WAS NO WATER IN SIGHT TO DRINK? OR FELT SO PRESSED AND IN NEED OF A TOILET BUT COULD SEE NONE IN SIGHT WHERE YOU COULD RELIEVE YOURSELF IN PEACE?

LACK OF ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER AND EFFECTIVE SANITATION IMPACTS THE HEALTH OF A COMMUNITY AS WELL AS THEIR ABILITY TO DEVELOP ECONOMICALLY.

HERE ARE SOME STAGGERING FACTS:

  • 2.5 billion people across the world don’t have somewhere safe to go to the toilet (WHO / UNICEF)
  • Bad sanitation is one of the world’s biggest killers: it hits women, children, old and sick people hardest
  • Every minute, three children under the age of five die because of dirty water and poor sanitation (WHO)
  • Right now, more than 50 per cent of hospital beds in developing countries are filled with people who have an illness caused by poor sanitation or dirty water (UNDP)
  • In Africa, half of young girls who drop out of school do so because they need to collect water – often from many miles away – or because the school hasn’t got a basic toilet.
  • The lack of a loo makes women and girls a target for sexual assault as they go to the toilet in the open, late at night
  • Many women get bitten by snakes as they squat in the grass to go to the toilet
  • For every £1 spent on a water and sanitation program, £8 is returned through saved time, increased productivity and reduced health costs. (UNDP)
  • In 2000, 189 countries signed up to the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. The sanitation target for 2015 is currently way off-target and won’t be met in sub-Saharan African until the 23rd century.

That is where Banza Sanitation comes in to help bridge the gap, especially as concerns availability of toilets in developing countries.

The Banza toilet can be used in the safety of the home, away from the reality of rapists and snakes.

It is a portable unit and can be moved around, and even taken on safaris.

With the pilot phase of rolling out the units to select case studies in Mathare settlement area having started, our ears are on the ground to know and understand the true benefits to the community.

So far, the recipients are excited about its convenience and portability, making trips to the pit latrine, and the use of flying toilets a thing of the past.

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The Banza toilet can be used in the safety of the home, away from the reality of rapists and snakes.

Our hope and desire is that if the Banza toilet achieves what it set out to, to bridge a gap in the sanitation cycle, it will move from just being used by select families in Mathare, to many other families around the country and the region.

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Bad sanitation is one of the world’s biggest killers: it hits women, children, old and sick people hardest


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IN RESPONSE TO THE W.H.O. CALL

According to the WHO (world Health Organisation), many common diseases that result in diarrhea can spread from one person to another when people defecate in the open. Therefore, disposing of excreta safely by isolating faecal waste from flies and other insects and preventing contamination of water supplies, would greatly reduce the spread of diseases.
That’s where the Banza Toilet comes in. As if in response to the WHO call, The Banza toilet has gone a step further by offering separate compartments for faecal matter and urine within its structure. The faecal matter is then collected on a daily basis by the cleaning agents and converted into renewable energy, instead of throwing it out in the open and exposing the community to diseases, supporting a green environment.
The portable toilet can also be used in the comfort of the home, addressing the issue of safety and convenience as well.
So far, the report on the ground from those who are already using it in Mathare, is positive. And this being the pilot phase, any feedback, both negative and positive, will help us learn, grow and improve service delivery.
For us, the sky is the limit in offering big ideas in solving societal challenges.

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Poorly designed toilet depositing its contents directly in the ditch below, which then mix with the water.

By: Joy Kiruki


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2.6 billion people worldwide do not have access to proper toilet facilities. The Banza Toilet Project aims to address this issue in Nairobi, Kenya, where the lack of clean and safe toilets results in environmental contamination and high instances of disease. A social enterprise venture, the Banza Toilet Project will create a new system of human waste management and provide a more dignified and sanitary toilet-user experience for residents of Nairobi’s Kibera slum.