Banza Sanitation

Promoting health and human dignity through improved sanitation


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GRATITUDE: This is the story of my mother

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Elizabeth Nyambura

My name is Elizabeth, I live in Nairobi.

This is the story of my mother, her name is Julia Wangari. My mum is 80 years old. She is a wonderful mother, a loving grandmother and a sweet great grandmother.

We live in Kasarani Mwiki. Over the years mum has been a hardworking lady. She has lived with asthma for a long time and was also known to have high blood pressure. However her life changed drastically when she was diagnosed with diabetes type 2, in the year 2003.she has had ill health all along. This year alone has been hospitalized twice, the last time in June –July. These ailments render her immobile. When she gets sick we are reduced to putting her on diapers. When she gets a little better she is helped to sit on a pail (ndoo) to relieve herself.

This changed when a friend of mine came to visit my mother and she talked of knowing of a kind of toilet that can be used next to the bed. At that time she had no idea where or who to contact. Later I noticed she had posted something about Banza Sanitation on face book that interested me to read.  At first, thought Banza sanitation is company that sells these kinds of toilets. I liked the page and from them I got information on Banza sanitation. I later posted a request to Banza who answered me immediately. They told me that they are having a pilot programme in Mathare slum. They gave me hope though, that they might extend the progamme to the bedridden and invalids in the future. They also asked me to write an e-mail to them indicating my need which I did. Later I got a call from Patrick who wanted me to set a meeting with him at his office.

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Me and my husband at the Banza office

On Friday 6th September, I met Patrick who gave me a toilet kit for my mother.  Me and my family are very happy and excited that now it is easy on us. The toilet is easy to use and also very clean and hygienic. My mother is happy because she feels that someone out there cares. Though sometimes she is losing memory, she expresses her joy in a short interview that we had with her.

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This is my mother admiring her new Banza toilet

I on behalf of my family, thank Banza sanitation for the good and noble work they are doing for the sick and the poor. May god bless you.

By Elizabeth Nyambura

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Great news for Banza Sanitation

The Sanitation Promotion Technology Working Group (TWG) under the Ministry of Health met on September 11th, 2013 and reviewed the Banza Toilet System as presented by Mr. Patrick Kiruki, CEO of Banza Ltd. 

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The TWG voted unanimously to adopt and recommend the Banza Toilet System as the countrywide standard and model for personal sanitation.

The TWG voted unanimously to adopt and recommend the Banza Toilet System as the countrywide standard and model for personal sanitation.  There was a complete consensus that this solution represents a remarkable prospect for improving personal hygiene and public health throughout Kenya.

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Ag. Senior Assistant Chief Public Health Officer seating on the Banza Toilet as he chairs the meeting


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THE REALITY OF SANITATION

EVER FELT SO THIRSTY BUT THERE WAS NO WATER IN SIGHT TO DRINK? OR FELT SO PRESSED AND IN NEED OF A TOILET BUT COULD SEE NONE IN SIGHT WHERE YOU COULD RELIEVE YOURSELF IN PEACE?

LACK OF ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER AND EFFECTIVE SANITATION IMPACTS THE HEALTH OF A COMMUNITY AS WELL AS THEIR ABILITY TO DEVELOP ECONOMICALLY.

HERE ARE SOME STAGGERING FACTS:

  • 2.5 billion people across the world don’t have somewhere safe to go to the toilet (WHO / UNICEF)
  • Bad sanitation is one of the world’s biggest killers: it hits women, children, old and sick people hardest
  • Every minute, three children under the age of five die because of dirty water and poor sanitation (WHO)
  • Right now, more than 50 per cent of hospital beds in developing countries are filled with people who have an illness caused by poor sanitation or dirty water (UNDP)
  • In Africa, half of young girls who drop out of school do so because they need to collect water – often from many miles away – or because the school hasn’t got a basic toilet.
  • The lack of a loo makes women and girls a target for sexual assault as they go to the toilet in the open, late at night
  • Many women get bitten by snakes as they squat in the grass to go to the toilet
  • For every £1 spent on a water and sanitation program, £8 is returned through saved time, increased productivity and reduced health costs. (UNDP)
  • In 2000, 189 countries signed up to the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. The sanitation target for 2015 is currently way off-target and won’t be met in sub-Saharan African until the 23rd century.

That is where Banza Sanitation comes in to help bridge the gap, especially as concerns availability of toilets in developing countries.

The Banza toilet can be used in the safety of the home, away from the reality of rapists and snakes.

It is a portable unit and can be moved around, and even taken on safaris.

With the pilot phase of rolling out the units to select case studies in Mathare settlement area having started, our ears are on the ground to know and understand the true benefits to the community.

So far, the recipients are excited about its convenience and portability, making trips to the pit latrine, and the use of flying toilets a thing of the past.

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The Banza toilet can be used in the safety of the home, away from the reality of rapists and snakes.

Our hope and desire is that if the Banza toilet achieves what it set out to, to bridge a gap in the sanitation cycle, it will move from just being used by select families in Mathare, to many other families around the country and the region.

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Bad sanitation is one of the world’s biggest killers: it hits women, children, old and sick people hardest


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IN RESPONSE TO THE W.H.O. CALL

According to the WHO (world Health Organisation), many common diseases that result in diarrhea can spread from one person to another when people defecate in the open. Therefore, disposing of excreta safely by isolating faecal waste from flies and other insects and preventing contamination of water supplies, would greatly reduce the spread of diseases.
That’s where the Banza Toilet comes in. As if in response to the WHO call, The Banza toilet has gone a step further by offering separate compartments for faecal matter and urine within its structure. The faecal matter is then collected on a daily basis by the cleaning agents and converted into renewable energy, instead of throwing it out in the open and exposing the community to diseases, supporting a green environment.
The portable toilet can also be used in the comfort of the home, addressing the issue of safety and convenience as well.
So far, the report on the ground from those who are already using it in Mathare, is positive. And this being the pilot phase, any feedback, both negative and positive, will help us learn, grow and improve service delivery.
For us, the sky is the limit in offering big ideas in solving societal challenges.

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Poorly designed toilet depositing its contents directly in the ditch below, which then mix with the water.

By: Joy Kiruki